Distribution of mRNAs encoding classical progestin receptor, progesterone membrane components 1 and 2, serpine mRNA binding protein 1, and progestin and ADIPOQ receptor family members 7 and 8 in rat forebrain.

TitleDistribution of mRNAs encoding classical progestin receptor, progesterone membrane components 1 and 2, serpine mRNA binding protein 1, and progestin and ADIPOQ receptor family members 7 and 8 in rat forebrain.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsIntlekofer KA, Petersen SL
JournalNeuroscience
Volume172
Pagination55-65
Date Published2011 Jan 13
AbstractSeveral lines of evidence suggest the existence of multiple progestin receptors that may account for rapid and delayed effects of progesterone in the CNS. The delayed effects have been long attributed to activation of the classical progestin receptor (Pgr). Recent studies have discovered novel progestin signaling molecules that may be responsible for rapid effects. These include progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (Pgrmc1), Pgrmc2, progestin and adipoQ receptor 7 (Paqr7) and Paqr8. The functions of these molecules have been investigated extensively in non-neural, but not in neural tissues, partly because it is unclear which are expressed in the brain and where they are expressed. To address these issues, we compared the distributions of mRNAs encoding Pgr, Pgrmc1, Pgrmc2, Paqr7 and Paqr8 using in situ hybridization with radiolabeled oligodeoxynucleotidyl probes in forebrain tissues of estradiol-treated female rats. We also examined the distribution of serpine mRNA binding protein 1 (Serbp1), a putative binding partner of Pgrmc1. Analyses of adjacent brain sections showed that the highest expression of mRNAs encoding Pgr, Pgrmc1, Pgrmc2 and Serbp1 was detected in several hypothalamic nuclei important for female reproduction. In contrast, expression patterns of Paqr7 and Paqr8 were low and homogeneous in the hypothalamus, and more abundant in thalamic nuclei. The neuroanatomical distributions of these putative progestin signaling molecules suggest that Pgrmc1 and Pgrmc2 may play roles in neuroendocrine functions while Paqr7 and Paqr8 are more likely to regulate sensory and cognitive functions.
DOI10.1002/stem.552
Alternate JournalNeuroscience